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Multicultural America (ENG 150): Digital Exhibit

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Assignment Instructions

For this project you will conduct group research using materials specially selected for your class by the UWM Archives. Your aim is to produce a project that analyzes the issues of Education, Activism, and Diversity in Milwaukee as interpreted, depicted, and reinforced in primary sources from Milwaukee’s history. You will work in groups of 5 members, and together your group will select one item to research, analyze and showcase.

Assignment steps:

  • Select a group based on the topic that interests you.
  • View selected collections in the UWM Archives or online.  The Archives will have selected boxes placed on hold so that you have easy access to materials for your project.
  • As a group, choose one item that is visually compelling and highlights issues of education, diversity, or activism in Milwaukee. This could be a photograph, a postcard, a video clip, an oral history, or a document.   
  • Analyze that item carefully, doing contextual research in the item’s collection and in secondary sources to help you understand the context in which the item was created.
  • As a group, write up a one page analysis summarizing your research and explaining how the item you chose provides a window into the issues of Milwaukee’s education, diversity, and activism at the time the item was created.
  • Submit your analysis along with the name and citation information of your selected item to your professor.  DUE DATE:  April 1.
  • UWM Archives staff will digitize any physical items, compile the analyses, and upload the files to a digital exhibit platform. The digital exhibit should be completed by the beginning of May and you will be provided with a link.

MLA Citation

In your bibliography (which MLA calls the “Works Cited”), state the: Author. Title of Manuscript/Document. date of composition (at least year; if unknown, write N.d.). form of material (MS for manuscript or work written by hand; TS for a typescript or work prepared by machine) along with "the name and location of the library, research institution, or personal collection housing the material."

For example:

Barbee, Lloyd A. Letter to Milwaukee Board of School Directors. 2 May 1965. March On Milwaukee Civil Rights History Project. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries. Web. 13 Jan. 2011. <http://collections.lib.uwm.edu/ u?/march,206>.

Kander, Lizzie Black. Photograph of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Kander. N.d. Lizzie Black Kander Papers, 1875-1960. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries, Archives Department.

O’Halloran, Pam. Interview by Michael Gordon. 16 Aug. 2007. March On Milwaukee Civil Rights History Project. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries. Web. 13 Jan. 2011. <http://collections.lib.uwm.edu/u?/ march,1523>.

WTMJ-TV. News film clip of Martin Luther King speaking at UW-Milwaukee. 23 Nov. 1965. March On Milwaukee Civil Rights History Project. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Libraries. Web. 13 Jan. 2011. <http://collections.lib.uwm.edu/u?/march,941>.

MLA directs writers to use parenthetical references in the body of their writing to identify their sources and the specific location in a source from which they borrowed material. See the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers for more information and examples.